Legal Translation

In international legal relations the translator's job is just as important as the services of a lawyer. An imprecise or false translation will inexorably lead to time-consuming litigation and loss of money. For that reason you would be well-advised to use the services of qualified legal translator who will provide you with a thoroughly researched and grammatically correct text that is in its substance accurate and faithful to the original document.
Your documents will be in particularly good hands. In my work as a state-certified and sworn-in translator in English, German and Polish I deal daily with legal documents such as agreements or court decisions. In addition to my many years of experience in translating such specialised texts, I have undertaken many interpreting assignments in the legal field (at various authorities, courts of law, notaries etc.), and also closely cooperate with several international law firms.

Flaggen Dreieck

Galamaga Translations is a member of BDÜ

Uebersetzer.eu Premium Mitglied

SDL Trados Studio - Software

Across Logo

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

(+49) 06131 6064914

Breaking News

09.11.2020
Interpreting at Mainz Employment Tribunal (German/Polish)


13.10.2020
Participating in the BDÜ webinar “Medical, Traffic-Psychological and Other Expert Opinions in Court”


30.09.2020
International Translation Day


17.09.2020
Interpreting at Mainz Register Office (German/English)

Blog

  • Are certified translations from Germany recognised abroad?

    For years I have been translating a variety of documents into English or Polish and certifying them in accordance with my official status as a sworn-in translator at Frankfurt am Main District Court. I am not aware of any single case where a certified translation issued by me would not be honoured outside Germany.

  • Legalisation, apostille, certification - what is this all about?

    The legalisation is a certification of authenticity of a foreign official document by a consular officer of the country in which the document is to be used. The apostille certifies (just like legalisation) the authenticity of an official document. However, an apostille is issued by the country in which the document itself was issued. This means that no official of a foreign country needs to be involved in the process.

  • Data protection policy

    As a sworn-in translator and interpreter I am often privy to sensitive information. Since I am obliged by law to treat all information confidentially, I do not disclose any written or spoken contents I gain knowledge of. Punishments extending from the German Confidentiality Act, by which I am bound, are far reaching. These include criminal acts such as the destruction of materials under official safekeeping, breach of confidentiality of written and spoken contents, breach of private secrets, and exploitation of somebody else's secrets or violation of tax secrets. I take the commitment to data confidentiality very seriously, be ensuring all possible precautions are heeded.